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RESUME
Arranging Symphonic, Piano, and Vocal Works for Performance on Carillon

By Frances Newell

Made possible by The Guild of Carillonneurs in North America, Barnes Scholarship

e-mail: francestownsend@wild4music.com

http://francesnewell.com

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Arranging Symphonic, Vocal, and Piano Works for performance on Carillon
by Frances Newell
Beethoven Pastoral Symphony, Final Movement, Section 5
Beethoven AUDIO CLIP 5 Hear MP3
mm 109-116, climax of whole symphony. Forceful 16th note triplets in strings are a very SPECIFIC type of tremolo. Most effective in wider intervals. Bass bells get to be the big story and should come out strong, indicated by marcati. Put in optional bells down to low G. Must consider reach of player from low pedal to high bells' tremolos. Want ALL the low bass notes, but sometimes must compromise and use G at top space, bass clef. Must remember how powerful ALL the low bells really are! Carillonneur should only play optional low A if comfortable musically.
mm 117-126, Gently bringing climax down, keep tremolos gentle as you decrescendo. No more marcati in bass. M128, indicate "non trem", so carillonneurs who play tremolandi regularly to sustain bells will know to stop tremolandi.
mm 130-131 and 143-146, apportamenti mean ACCENT not PUNCH. Phrasing essential to end.
Dynamics are right out of Beethoven's score except when volume on one layer needed to be adjusted to bring out themes in different octave.
Composer's articulations cannot be followed EXACTLY by the carillonneur, but serve as a guide to the composer's INTENTIONS! Speaking to the carillonneurs musical instincts will guide the player to use subtle differences in touch.
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